The Unbelievably Beautiful Tasha Tudor Costume Collection

July 30, 2012

The Tasha Tudor Collection on Whitaker Auctions

Sheer Cotton Dress, circa 1830

I consider myself a costumer collector, but my collection is nowhere near as awe-inspiring as the collection of Tasha Tudor, an illustrator and children’s book writer.

Her collection spanned all of the 19th century, especially the rare and wonderful fashions between 1830 and 1850. She collected not just gowns, but shoes, hats, undergarments, men’s clothes, children’s dresses, and more! The collection was put up for auction by the Charles A. Whitaker Auction Company in 2007, a year before the beloved author died. It’s truly a beautiful archive of all fashion types during the 1800s!

Here are some of my favorite pieces:

Printed & Voided Velvet Gown, circa 1850-1860

Bonnet, circa 1860-1870

Green Changeant Silk Dress, circa 1840

Man’s Cotton Banyan Coat, circa 1830

(This coat probably began it’s life in the mid-to-late 18th century and was refashioned later to suit new tastes in fit)

Mauveine Child’s Dress, circa 1850

Fritilaria Printed Wool Dress, circa 1830-1840

Deconstructed Plaid Silk Dress, circa 1860

Lady’s Chameleon Shoes, circa 1830-1850

(This style of slipper is called “Chameleon” because, like the color-changing lizard, they could be embroidered in any color to match any gown!)

Pink Silk Brocade Dress & Petticoat, circa 1770

Unusual Sheer Evening Dress, circa 1800-1820

Apron Front Gown, circa 1820

American Military Academy Uniform, circa 1860

Kashmiri Embroidered Cloak, circa 1800-1820

These are just a tiny sample of all the wonderful fashions! To view the entire 400+ piece auction archive, click here or on the picture below. There are beautiful changeable silk gowns, mauveine dresses, velvet Spencer jackets, and lovely examples of lady’s unmentionables to study!


Tasha Tudor, August 28, 1915 – June 18, 2008

Thank you, Ms. Tudor, for your wonderful collections, work, and life. You have touched many lives with your books and your spirit lives on through them. Thank you.

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